President Thein Sein to donate robes to Burmese monastery in Gaya Skip to main content

President Thein Sein to donate robes to Burmese monastery in Gaya

New Delhi (Mizzima) – Burmese President Thein Sein began an official visit to India on Wednesday with a trip to donate robes to a Burmese monastery in Bodh Gaya in Gaya, India, on Thursday.

Burmese President Thein Sein, center, is welcomed by Indian officials upon arrival at Gaya International Airport on October 12, 2011. His official visit to India offers New Delhi a chance to deepen its relations with a neighbour that has traditionally allied with India's regional rival China. Thein Sein will travel to two major Buddhist pilgrimage sites in eastern India before flying to New Delhi on Friday for the official leg of his state visit. Photo: AFP
Burmese President Thein Sein, center, is welcomed by Indian officials upon arrival at Gaya International Airport on October 12, 2011. His official visit to India offers New Delhi a chance to deepen its relations with a neighbour that has traditionally allied with India's regional rival China. Thein Sein will travel to two major Buddhist pilgrimage sites in eastern India before flying to New Delhi on Friday for the official leg of his state visit. Photo: AFP
Thein Sein’s four-day visit is his first visit to India since he was sworn in as president in March. He took a special flight on Wednesday to Gaya, the location where Buddha is said to have attained his enlightenment.

During the state visit, he will go to New Delhi and meet with Indian President Pratibha Devisingh Patil and Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, according to a statement released by India’s foreign ministry.

Thein Sein, his wife, Khin Khin Win, and the Burmese delegation, which comprises 59 people, arrived at Gaya at around 11 a.m. on Wednesday.  The robe donation ceremony will be held at 10 a.m. Thursday at a Burmese monastery at Bodh Gaya. Monks from 17 monasteries in Bodh Gaya will attend the ceremony, a monk told Mizzima.

Thein Sein planned to visit Mahabodhi Temple to pay homage to Buddha and light oil lamps on Wednesday evening, the Full Moon Day of Thadingyut, according to the Burmese Buddhist calendar. Temple authorities were making preparations including security measures.

On Thursday evening, the delegation will travel to New Delhi, the capital of India. The Burmese delegation will pay homage at the Mahatma Gandhi Mausoleum. On Saturday, the last day of the visit, they will visit the India Agricultural Research facility.
According to a presidential adviser, the Burmese and Indian leaders will discuss the political and economic relationship between the two countries and border security issues.

A few days before President Thein Sein’s visit, Indian newspapers reported that Indian Maoist rebels, popularly known as Naxalites, had a plan to open training camps inside Burmese territory within weeks, according to documents seized by police.
On September 26, at the fourth meeting of the Joint Trade Commission held in New Delhi, Indian Commerce Minister Anand Sharma and Burmese Commerce Minister Win Myint agreed to double bilateral trade to US$ 3 billion by 2015.

India has invested in Burmese sectors including medicine, railroads, oil and natural gas, mining and hydropower. The value of the existing bilateral trade is about US$ 1.5 billion.

The two countries expect that the construction of the Kaladan Multimodal Transit Transport Project will be completed in 2013 at a cost of more than US$ 120 million.

Meanwhile, media reports have noted the competition between India and China to gain economic interests in Burma. Burma’s decision to halt the Myitsone Dam project last week was a blow to China, which is also constructing a pipeline project through Burma to transport oil and natural gas to Kunming in Yunnan Province.

Thein Sein’s last visit to India was in November 2008 when he was Burma’s prime minister.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Chronology of the Press in Burma

1836 – 1846 * During this period the first English-language newspaper was launched under British-ruled Tenasserim, southern  Burma . The first ethnic Karen-language and Burmese-language newspapers also appear in this period.     March 3, 1836 —The first English-language newspaper,  The Maulmain Chronicle , appears in the city of Moulmein in British-ruled Tenasserim. The paper, first published by a British official named E.A. Blundell, continued up until the 1950s. September 1842 —Tavoy’s  Hsa-tu-gaw  (the  Morning Star ), a monthly publication in the Karen-language of  Sgaw ,  is established by the Baptist mission. It is the first ethnic language newspaper. Circulation reached about three hundred until its publication ceased in 1849. January 1843 —The Baptist mission publishes a monthly newspaper, the Christian  Dhamma  Thadinsa  (the  Religious Herald ), in Moulmein. Supposedly the first Burmese-language newspaper, it continued up until the first year of the second Angl

Thai penis whitening trend raises eyebrows

Image copyright LELUXHOSPITAL Image caption Authorities warn the procedure could be quite painful A supposed trend of penis whitening has captivated Thailand in recent days and left it asking if the country's beauty industry is taking things too far. Skin whitening is nothing new in many Asian countries, where darker skin is often associated with outdoor labour, therefore, being poorer. But even so, when a clip of a clinic's latest intriguing procedure was posted online, it quickly went viral. Thailand's health ministry has since issued a warning over the procedure. The BBC Thai service spoke to one patient who had undergone the treatment, who told them: "I wanted to feel more confident in my swimming briefs". The 30-year-old said his first session of several was two months ago, and he had since seen a definite change in the shade. 'What for?' The original Facebook post from the clinic offering the treatment, which uses lasers to break do

Myanmar Villagers Tell of 150 Homes Burned in Deadly Army Air Attacks

Artillery fire and aerial bombardments by Myanmar forces killed three civilians and burned scores of houses in their communities in mid-March amid fighting between Myanmar forces and the rebel Arakan Army in war-ravaged Rakhine state, villagers recounted Monday at a press conference. Villagers from Kyauktaw township in western Myanmar's Rakhine state discuss the government military's attacks on their communities at press conference in Sittwe, March 30, 2020. They made the comments after traveling from in Kyauktaw township to the state capital Sittwe to give testimony on a series of attacks on civilian dwellings amid a government-imposed internet shutdown in nine townships in Rakhine and neighboring Chin state, cutting off vital information about the fighting. They villagers accused the Myanmar Army of conducting an aerial bombing on civilian communities that destroyed about 150 homes and a monastery in Pyaing Taing village, while government soldiers on the g